V8689: I like to make things complicated (or: why my April Fail-Bingo blouse was finished late May, posted in June, and also a multitasking RBG trip)

Oops! But the picture looks pretty cool I think so ... here it is anyway.
Oops! But the picture looks pretty cool I think so … here it is anyway.

Saturdays are busy days Chez McDowell.

Yes, yes, Saturdays are busy for everyone–but this is my blog, so I get to talk about my own busy Saturdays.

Saturdays are the days I do a full week’s worth of errands (groceries, bills, library, drugstore, etc.) , get in a decent workout, a longer-than-average-shower, any required yard work, and oh yeah, wouldn’t it be nice to do some blog photos or some sewing? All before 6pm, which is when my daughter comes back from her Dad’s house. Technically yes I could do some of that on Sunday, but my Frances-time is precious to me and I prefer to keep it as free as possible so we can hang out and I can listen to all of the amazing and quirky and clever and hilarious things that go on in her head. I do laundry on Sundays. Everything else I try to do on Saturdays, before 6.

Royal Botanical Gardens Lilac Dell with a band playing. Lots of trees = privacy, right?
Royal Botanical Gardens Lilac Dell with a band playing. Lots of trees = privacy, right?

As a result, my handmade garments have been piling up and I haven’t had a chance to shoot any of them. Why do I think every year that May will be a great chance to get outside for some decent photographs? Of course I’m outside–mowing the lawn, pulling weeds, picking up branches, trimming the hedges, and generally filling up my time and getting myself so sweat-grimed that a camera lens is the last thing I want to see.

This Saturday I was determined to get those photos done. I thought–hey! The lilac dell is in full bloom at the Royal Botanical Gardens; I need to renew my membership anyway; I can combine it with a hike while I’m there and kill two birds with one stone, plus it’s the RBG and so guaranteed to be gorgeous. Accordingly, I brought my camera, timer and tripod to the RBG and took some hopefully discreet selfies in the lilacs and along the trail while Getting My Exercise, Appreciating Nature, Renewing My Membership, and Losing Five Pounds in Sweat Through My Face.

Fortunately you can't see the sweat pouring off my face like the Mississippi. Right?
Fortunately you can’t see the sweat pouring off my face like the Mississippi. Right? Also: to go with the multi-tasking theme, you can expect this outfit to reappear when I blog the shorts. I’ll try to use different shots though.

It was so hot, Dear Readers; almost 30C. In May. I tremble to think of August.

Keep all that in mind while you read about the many ways I unnecessarily complicated my Fail Bingo shirt.


 

So this blouse took a long time.

blog-192-22

Partly because it was a new pattern, to me. I made it up in a size 14D as a test garment, tweaked the fit to be a bit looser around the bust and less loose around the waist, along with the standard shorter in the back and broader in the shoulders. On the whole it was pretty good and I consider these minor tweaks. Oh, plus moving the shoulder seam forward by about 3/4″.

Partly because I made it out of the cotton/silk voile that I adore so much and used for the other Vogue blouse. It is quite sheer and needs underlining. In fact, even with the underlining, it`s still a bit sheer. But I can wear it to work without embarrassing myself, and that’s key.

Of course, it`s a yoked blouse with princess seams, which means there are fifteen pieces to be underlined before assembly.

View D, the one I made–but without the boob pockets.

Fifteen.

Two of each, of course, stitched together carefully by hand before assembling the blouse. I bought 1 1/2 metres originally, and ran out and needed to buy an additional half metre to finish the shirt. That’s two-metres for one short-sleeved blouse (cost-wise still not bad though; under $30 including thread!).

Mercy.

Partly because this blouse pattern suggests felled seams. Which means sew together, trim one side of the seam, press the other one in half, fold it over the trimmed side, and sew it down again. Or you know, buy a felling foot and use that. I don’t have a felling foot. I`m reconsidering this, however, in light of the amount of time spent assembling this blouse. Though Janome doesn’t make a felling foot. Anyone have any generics they can recommend?

The Back. Horizontal lines brought to you by the treachery of tucking in. Why do they do that?
The Back. Horizontal lines brought to you by the treachery of tucking in. Why do they do that?

The pattern does not suggest finishing the seams in the sleeves, which is just odd. I ended up felling the sleeve seams and french-seaming the shoulders, then top-stitching the french seams down. This voile is incredibly light-weight and cut edges essentially disintegrate on contact with air, so sturdy finishing is necessary. I accidentally top-stitched the french seam down outwards instead of inwards (oops) but I love it anyway.

Inside Out. Yes, this is the inside of the shirt. Right? Also you can see how semi-transparent it is by reading the dry-cleaning joint's logo through the yoke.
Inside Out. Yes, this is the inside of the shirt. Right? Also you can see how semi-transparent it is by reading the dry-cleaning joint’s logo through the yoke.

I wish the buttons were a bit smaller and a closer colour match. It turns out that citron is not an easy colour to find in small shirt buttons. Who’d have guessed.  Other than that, I freaking love this shirt. It’s incredibly soft and lightweight, it’s loose enough to be comfortable to wear without being baggy, and it’s CITRON. Consider: it was 30C, just about; my face was a river and my bottom half got plenty sweaty under those shorts but the shirt, even double-layered as it was, stayed comfortable to the very end, even hiking in the woods.

The Side. From very far away. Sorry about that.
The Side. From very far away. Sorry about that.

I interfaced the shirt with a light sew-in interfacing; I avoid fusibles wherever possible. It’s not as crisp as a fusible would have been but it keeps the softness and drape beautifully.

I’ve now fitted three separate and slightly different Vogue button-up shirt patterns (this one with yokes and princess seams, one with princess seams only, and one with princess seams and a gathered front–yes, there’s a theme). I’ve got one with pintucks left, and then I’ll have four blouse/shirt patterns that should get me through whatever kind of button-up shirt I want to make pretty much forever. Add to the list a wish to learn how to make a hidden button placket on every shirt forever so I never need to worry about perfectly matching buttons. I’m reading through David Coffin’s two shirtmaking books right now (yes, simultaneously) in an effort to master this and other tricky bits of shirtmakery before tackling the pink cotton voile shirt I’ve already cut out.

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11 thoughts on “V8689: I like to make things complicated (or: why my April Fail-Bingo blouse was finished late May, posted in June, and also a multitasking RBG trip)”

  1. I like the combo with those shorts. I still haven’t finished my blouse – it’s been sitting, complete except for buttons and cuffs for oh, about two months now.

    1. Yeah–but at least you did something on it before the deadline. I can honestly only fill in one square on my bingo card (didn’t finish in time) because everything else happened in May.

  2. The inside is immaculate and I don’t even want to think how tedious it is to cut 15 pieces twice and sew them together afterwards. You put a lot of work into this blouse, but isn’t the result SO satisfying?
    And I didn’t dare to say it when I saw this outfit on instagram, but OMG look at those pins!

  3. Very nice work, well done. Regarding flat felled seams, here’s a tutorial that shows how to use the foot but I think it is worth watching for the technique because you can duplicate it without the foot. I’ve done this and it works. I believe it is the same technique used for Industrial sewing. Basically: fabric wrong sides together with the back piece on top (as is standard), slide the top piece back just over 1/4″ lining up with the bottom fabric edge, then fold the bottom piece over it and stitch a straight line with a 1/4″ seam. The important part is the stitching line not if you catch all of the underpart (it will stay secure with your next line of stitching). Then turn the seam again and stitch using your first stitching line as a guide, press.
    Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFzxeh4N3q8
    Generic flat felling foot that may work for you link: http://www.amazon.com/Generic-Felling-Foot/dp/B0015S966U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1433916097&sr=8-1&keywords=flat+fell+foot+for+janome
    Regards,

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