V8997, the Sheath Dress Edition

Perfect place to take outside pictures in public with a good back-drop and no observers: a church on Saturday night!
Perfect place to take outside pictures in public with a good back-drop and no observers: a church on Saturday night!

I bought this stretch cotton pique at Fabricland on sale for $5/metre knowing that it would make the perfect V8997 sheath dress–snug but still comfy! Big colourful floral pattern! Enough body to hold it’s shape nicely! Figuring out the perfect lining fabric took a little longer, but eventually I settled on a stretch cotton poplin in white. I wanted something with the same give of the fabric, first of all, but secondly, I wanted to keep the cotton feel and breathability for those super-hot days in July and August when anything slippery on the skin feels like a wet plastic bag coated with silicone.

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Yes, I know; it’s summer now and I still look like a ghost. It’s either that or bright red, Dear Readers. I don’t do tan. Actually, this is my tan.

As I’d made the circle-skirt version of this before, the sheath dress was pretty simple. I shortened the bodice pieces on the shorten line, as last time it was too long; it turned out to be just a smidge too much and next time I’ll put back in 1/2″ of it. I also needed to take out between 1/8″ and 1/4″ for all the waist and hip seams (and that’s a lot–there’s eight pieces between the front and back) to make it reasonably snug and sheath-like. I took out about 1/4″ on the princess seam right at the armscye as well, to deal with some gaping that only become evident once the whole thing was sewn together (of course–so it had to be disassembled and reassembled at that seam. Always an adventure).

I also added about 3/4″ to the inside of the v at the shoulders to better cover bra straps.

The Back! Which I forgot to do up at the hook & eye. Oops.
The Back! Which I forgot to do up at the hook & eye. Oops.

The main variation was the welting. This is the same white stretch cotton poplin I used for the lining, in 1 1/2″ bias strips, folded in half. One of the things I really love about this dress pattern is the seamlines, particularly that angle around the waist (empire waist in this case thanks to the extra shortening–d’oh!), and I didn’t want it to be hidden by the busy print. And then I thought if I were going to add welting around the waist I should add it at the neckline and armscye as well, just for greater consistency and visual balance.

The Side. Still debating if I should snug in the waist a bit more. The stretch means it has a tendency to bag out a bit after wear.
The Side. Still debating if I should snug in the waist a bit more. The stretch means it has a tendency to bag out a bit after wear.

I’m glad I did. I think it looks sharp, emphasizes those seamlines well, and adds an extra 1/2″ on the shoulders for even more bra strap coverage (key!). But oh my god did it ever make assembling those pieces that much more finicky and time consuming.

The zipper was just a regular white zipper–I didn’t want to mess with an invisible zipper with a really thick and spongy pique fabric. But hey! Check out how those seamlines and welts match up!

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Not bad, eh?

Used a blind stitch for the main fabric at the hem, and my new 6mm hemming foot for the lining, which I totally love and which is also going to revolutionize my shirtmaking, I can tell. It was the easiest hem I’ve ever sewn in my life, ever.

And a ton of hand-stitching to attach linings to seamlines internally once most of the construction was done.

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I’ve worn it a few times already and I can atest to it being super, super comfortable, thanks to the stretch. Like pajamas comfortable. And find me another sheath dress that you would compare to pajamas, I dare you.

Can you see the migraine in these photos? Plus: meet Butch, an arm-patch activity monitor I'm wearing for a few weeks as part of a medical study. Butch joins Bertha, my insulin pump (named after the crazy wife in Jane Eyre--yes, really) and the Biologist, a continuous glucose monitor I'm also wearing for the study. The Biologist does not get along with acetaminophen, which is the only kind of painkiller I can take. Point being that until July 6, when I get a headache, I get to just suffer through it. And also I will be sporting extra weird medial bulges in blog photos for a couple of weeks. Did you care? Probably not.
Can you see the migraine in these photos?
Plus: meet Butch, an arm-patch activity monitor I’m wearing for a few weeks as part of a medical study. Butch joins Bertha, my insulin pump (named after the crazy wife in Jane Eyre–yes, really) and the Biologist, a continuous glucose monitor I’m also wearing for the study. The Biologist does not get along with acetaminophen, which is the only kind of painkiller I can take. Point being that until July 6, when I get a headache, I get to just suffer through it. And also I will be sporting extra weird medial bulges in blog photos for a couple of weeks. Did you care? Probably not.
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10 thoughts on “V8997, the Sheath Dress Edition”

  1. I love the dress and the fabric is gorgeous. A comfy sheath dress seems like an impossible dream!

    I love that you named your insulin pump Bertha. My sewing machine is Jane and my serger Rochester (it’s loud and temperamental). Bertha seems like a fitting name. I hope the next two weeks are pain free for you! I know how much migraines suck when you have no relief. 😦 Many pain-free wishes to you!

    1. I should name my sewing machines too. I’ve never thought to do that somehow.

      Bertha is fitting. She’s crazy; I wish I could get rid of her but I’m stuck with her for life; and I keep her hidden. 😉

      Thanks for the pain-free wishes. 🙂 So far so good since the weekend. About two weeks to go.

  2. The dress is stunning! Love the colour and the fits spot on!
    Good luck with all the medical attachments, my mum calls our caravan Bertha- she’s even got her own Facebook page!

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