This is Not a Stowe

The Market Tote bag as made up in the book. Yes ok, theirs is prettier. But I like my owls. See in link: http://www.chroniclebooks.com/blog/2011/06/23/in-praise-of-totes/

This is the Market Tote bag from 1, 2, 3, Sew. I made two, a stash-busting project to use up the laminated owl-print cotton I bought years ago to make bags, and then didn’t.

The book contains 33 projects, most with full-size paper patterns included. And the Market Tote bag is better than the Stowe.

For one thing, it’s fully lined. And for another, the contrasting panels make for a more interesting design.

Because it’s lined, should you want to add interior pockets, you can do so without the stitching showing through to the outside. It’s also tougher. The book recommends burlap and cotton outers with a canvas lining, but I imagine you could use about any kind of fabric you like, so long as either the lining or the outer fabric is canvas-weight. Regardless, it’s two fabric thicknesses, which is nice and durable.

On these, in addition to the laminated cotton used on the outer bottom, I used a medium-weight linen in a coordinating colour for the top, and lined it with a heavy canvas. They are sturdy, tough bags that carry a lot of groceries. And because the bottom is laminated, I can put these on the ground if I need to.

Also, Simba approves. Or maybe he just smells the port.
Also, Simba approves. Or maybe he just smells the pork.

The instructions are fairly clear and the bag sews up quickly. The only downside–and I imagine this would apply to a bag with any similar profile, including the Stowe–is that it uses up a lot of fabric. Most tote bags are made out of an assemblage of rectangles, which means you can jigsaw the pattern pieces around on the fabric to get the best fit and stretch the fabric farther. When the handle is cut on to the bag with all the swoopy curves and such, you can’t do this. It uses a surprising yardage and the leftovers are odd shapes that are difficult to use for other projects.

The other downside is that the lining piece appears to me to be a bit longer than the exterior. Double-check before you sew them together to make sure you won’t have lining puddling in the bottom of the bag, just in case. 1, 2, 3, Sew does have issues with their projects in measurements of pieces, so I’d recommend double-checking before cutting and/or sewing, just to be on the safe side. I’ve identified a few others in my GoodReads review.

From this book, in addition to the Market Tote bag, I’ve made the pencil holder (x4), plaid coasters (x approx. 12), doodle bag, lunch sack (x2), and lawn cosmetic bag, with plans to make up the mouse pincushion someday. Technically I’ve also used the other zippered pouch pattern, but it’s the same as any other zippered pouch pattern pattern you’d find anywhere, so we won’t count that one. $25 for the book on-line, divided by 7, is about $4 per pattern.

$4 Cdn. Not US $18.

I think I can handle being hopelessly uncool, under the circumstances.

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7 thoughts on “This is Not a Stowe”

  1. I love this post so much. Such a great comparison of the two patterns and the issues I have with the one that your bag is not and shall not be named. 😉

    I love the laminated owls on the bottom. 😀

    1. Thanks. 😀 I’m happy to be carrying groceries in bags that don’t have logos on them.

      I don’t understand the appeal of the other one. For $18 for a tote bag pattern, I’d be wondering if it came with some stock in Bernina, or a solid gold label to affix to the inside.

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