Burda 11/2016 Skirt 102: Identity Crisis Version

You’d never know from reading here, but I’ve never had an extravagant wardrobe.

Ok, enough, pick yourselves off the floor and stop laughing already. I’m serious.

All four seasons of clothes have always fit in one small closet and a dresser. I bought my first-ever raincoat and pair of rain boots in my thirties. I bought my wedding dress for $200 off the rack at a mall–it was blue. (It’s amazing how cheap nice dresses can be when they’re not white.) There was nothing in my earlier life to predict that this blog subject would ever be something I would consider, even blind drunk and high on cocaine.

(Note: I’ve never been drunk or done any drugs harder than caffeine. Just in case you thought I spoke from any personal experience.)

So it is with some chagrin, served up with a side of identity crisis, that I report that as of finishing this skirt … I need to buy a new skirt hanger. Because otherwise I can’t hang it.

bloggish-181

Worse: I made another one just like it. Well, except in a different colour.

What have I become?

This is a silk/wool plaid end I bought years and years ago at the Creativ Festival, 2m for something like $20. I made the meringue skirt from the Colette sewing book and regretted it: it was too big, wouldn’t stay in place, and the scallops didn’t look right with the fabric. Eventually I gave it away. But I kept looking at the scraps and thinking, I bet there’s enough to make a skirt here.

I was right!

Of course, it’s short. I was able to cut everything out on grain but there wasn’t enough to ensure pattern matching; three of the four main seams worked but the big piece on the front could not be cut out any way other than what it was, so:

The Side that doesn't match
The Side that doesn’t match

The flounces are curvy pieces so while the centre is on-grain, the sides are on the bias, and there’s no sense even trying to pattern match those. But the back and the right side worked out:

Pattern matching across the zipper: not too bad!
Pattern matching across the zipper: not too bad!
The Other Side, Which Matches
The Other Side, Which Matches

The flounce is super cute. I just serged the bottom edge with matching threads and it worked fine.

The skirt is lined inside to just above the flounce.

It’s a cute pattern that works well and goes together fairly easily, even with the flounce. The flounce gives it a bit of an a-line-with-edge vibe.

…so of course I had to make it again.

The Front/Side/Flounce

It’s a new thing I’m trying. I have this habit of seeing a pattern I like and telling myself, “It’s cute. I’ll make it up out of these scraps and see what I think.” And then never getting around to making a ‘good’ version out of not-scraps. Not that there’s anything inherently wrong with having clothes made out of scraps, if they turn out well; they’re essentially free clothes if you discount the time value. But it would be nice to take those patterns I worked to fit so nicely and use them on not-scraps more often. Which is how I ended up with two keyhole dresses, two winged skirts, and now two flounce skirts.

This one in a royal blue/purple wool crepe.

The Back

It was distinctly not free. The wool was about $30/yard. The lining, though, was the remainders from the lining for the leather and suede skirts, so free. And I already had the zipper. So about $45 for a wool skirt that fits. Plus that colour makes me happy.

My father’s wife always had a fantastic style sense. She spent a lot of money on her clothes, which took up the walk-in closet in the master bedroom, the closet in the guest room, and a couple of racks in the basement. More power to her, but when my winter boots got holes in the bottom or the lining fell out of my winter coat, she’d refuse to replace or even repair them. Sometimes for Christmas or my birthday I’d get some really nice clothes, and there was usually a back-to-school shopping trip, and that would be it. This meant I could, most years, dress ok for fall through spring assuming everything held up, but for summer I had to be creative. And then she seemed to decide that I was her physical clone and started buying me clothes and shoes–in her size. We are not the same size. I’d have skirts that hung off my hips, shirts that fell off my shoulders. It was all very, very odd. In any case, I got used to having an eccentric wardrobe that didn’t take up a lot of space.

The Side

And now I am in the position of having to buy a second skirt hanger for the first time actually in my entire life. Or I suppose I could ship off an old skirt to a happier home.

I guess I’m still doing the eccentric part all right, though.

I have no idea where this came from. But here it is. If I ever start talking about buying racks for the basement for extra clothes, please someone shake sense into me.

(Brace yourself: there’s a dress pattern based off the skirt pattern and of course I have to make that up too.) (HELP)

7 thoughts on “Burda 11/2016 Skirt 102: Identity Crisis Version”

  1. Now that I sew, I am packing my closet full of stuff. My husband’s side, which I am extremely respectful of not impinging on, is definitely more sparse. Mine is packed to the brim but his has lots of negative space. I’m forever buying new skirt hangers. Part of my issue is not getting rid of the older skirts. lol.

    I love the two new skirts, but especially that purple one. I’m definitely in love with that. 😀 I also really love the flounce on it and fully support you making the dress version. 😉

  2. Those skirts are perfect in every way. I love them! Re: your need for a new skirt hanger, because the clothes you make are so distinctive, you need to have more of them. Also, as I’ve said before, having a large assortment that you actually wear makes each piece last longer, and since you are making them up with classic lines and ageless fabrics, they won’t seem dated in 5 or even 10 years

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