V1353: Again, With B‏irds

I could not pass this print up.

Close-up of the print. It almost looks like I matched it along the zipper on purpose. Honestly I can’t remember if that was intentional or not.

It’s a slightly stiff (poplin?) lightweight cotton with a watercolour print of trees, leaves, flowers and birds. I lined it with white cotton voile to keep it very light and wearable for super-hot days in the summer (so here’s hoping we have at least one or two this year). And it is a V1353 again, which makes #3. I made a few minor fitting fidgets but otherwise it is the same as the rainbow linen one.

The Front

One of the fitting fidgets was less successful; the bust darts on the rainbow linen one are quite low, so I raised them about an inch on the pattern paper. When the dress was ready for trying on I realized this was because the rainbow linen one had loosened up over the year and now sits about an inch lower than it did, so now the bird-print version darts are too high. Oops. At this point it’ll either stay high, or loosen up and sink as the rainbow one did, and only time will tell.

The Side

This one was fussy-cut as I didn’t want to decapitate any birds in a pleat or a seamline. That would be grisly. So I laid the pattern pieces out on the fabric on a single layer so I could be sure that the birds remained whole. I also tried to maintain some print continuity between the skirt and bodice but the pleats made that really hard. It’s kind of there. I do like how one branch crawls up a shoulder (that part I do remember doing on purpose). You can’t clearly see any of the birds on a skirt in any of these pictures so please just take my word for it that no bird parts were severed in the making of this dress.

The Back

Does anything make this different from the rainbow linen dress or am I just bragging about the fabric find? (Cheap too! 40% off so like $8/m or so.)

Just the hem stitching.

The instructions tell you to do a saddle stitch by hand to hold the wide hem band in place. I’ve yet to do so.  (A saddle stitch is a kind of double running stitch that looks like a back stitch when done. Why you wouldn’t just do a back stitch, I’m not sure. I mean, in leather or anything with two visible faces, sure; but for something like this there’s really no advantage.) This time I did a 1/4″ running stitch instead, with an even width marked off by a quilting ruler and a chalk wheel, in white perle cotton. It’s a bit chunky but still shiny, and very subtle on the dress background. So subtle, in fact, that you can’t even see it in the pictures.

You can see a smidge of puckering in spots along that line because the hem band and the skirt were not precisely the same size, and that was with a good amount of pulling and yanking on the skirt to stay even. Overall I’m happy with it though.

You can’t even see the hem stitching, can you?

Sizing Note

According to the measurement chart I should be a size 16/18 (you’re all going to get sick of me saying that).

This dress is cut as a size 12/14  and then tweaked for individual fit issues:

1. Removed 1″ from each centre back seam, tapering to 1/4″ at the waist, to stop the zipper from gaping.

2. Took in side seams at the waist over 1″.

3. Took out length in the front armscye around the princess dart to reduce gaping.

4.  Lengthened the bodice front about 1/2″ to eliminate waist tilt.

 

8 thoughts on “V1353: Again, With B‏irds”

    1. Weirdly it seems to be a few degrees warmer in Hamilton most of the time, so we’ve already had a few good hot days. 🙂 I hope it gets a bit warmer for you TO folks too!

  1. I can see why you loved the fabric so much and the dress pattern is gorgeous too with pleats and fitted bodice. You have really done justice to the dress. Love your blog and the discussions on climate change.

    1. Thanks Janine. 🙂

      I really enjoy your blog too. For some reason my google account doesn’t handle commenting on blogspot posts very well but I read your site often and really enjoy it.

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