Crafters for Climate

I’ve done something a bit mad, and I’ll talk about why I’ve done this to myself more in another post, but for today I’ll just tell you what it is: I’ve committed to creating, hosting or participating in one public Climate Change event connected to each of my hobbies, ideally before the Canadian election inContinue reading “Crafters for Climate”

Political Will is a Quilting Bee

Why progressive politicians with majority mandates don’t pursue more aggressive climate policy is one of the great mysteries of our time. Apparently. Or not. Because to me it makes perfect sense. This conundrum comes from a complete misunderstanding of what political will is and where it comes from. Political will is not like iron ore.Continue reading “Political Will is a Quilting Bee”

A bunch of long words about something we already intuitively understand: social capital and building resilience to climate change impacts

(It’s a Season of Presentations apparently, Dear Readers; and here’s one I gave on Thursday evening at the first public meeting for a Community Response to Extreme Weather (CREW) group and project in one of our lower-income communities. It ties in nicely with the bit on Building Communities I wrote here recently, so I thoughtContinue reading “A bunch of long words about something we already intuitively understand: social capital and building resilience to climate change impacts”

Start Where You Live

Right now, your body exists in a physical space: your feet, your back, your legs, press against some surface. Your lungs fill and empty with oxygen we don’t share. Your fingers rest against a screen or on keys; you can hear a furnace, or an air conditioner, or people talking or laughing, or a busContinue reading “Start Where You Live”

Losing the Plot (and maybe finding it again)

Those of you who have met me in the last few years, particularly online, especially particularly through the blog, may not know that I used to write. A lot. As in, I started reading novels when I was five, and started writing them when I was seven. As in, I have an overflowing bankers boxContinue reading “Losing the Plot (and maybe finding it again)”

The Age of Angry Women

I’ve been keeping journals since elementary school, and they are, generally, what you would expect from journals: hard-back notebooks filled with lined pages covered in a not always legible scrawl of to do lists, New Year’s Resolutions, goals I had or things I wanted to try, quandaries I was trying to work through, and ofContinue reading “The Age of Angry Women”

Review: Banned on the Hill: A True Story about Dirty Oil and Government Censorship

(What happened? Summer. Also, home laptop broke. New laptop working, but would not connect to network. None of these things facilitate blogging. ┬áHiking and gardening are more fun anyway, yes?) Banned on the Hill: A True Story about Dirty Oil and Government Censorship by Franke James My rating: 5 of 5 stars I am theContinue reading “Review: Banned on the Hill: A True Story about Dirty Oil and Government Censorship”

Are there no prisons? Are there no workhouses?

Hallowe’en is over; Christmas begins. Soon–much sooner than most of us are prepared to think–Canadians will be wrapped in blankets on the couch cradling cups of hot cocoa or eggnog, watching reruns of one of the many versions of A Christmas Carol. We will empathize with Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim (or at least IContinue reading “Are there no prisons? Are there no workhouses?”

Ecology, Economy, and Ego

When spotted owls were threatened with extinction, we cried and passed laws. When whales were threatened with extinction, we screamed and wrote international treaties. Now, when polar bears are going extinct, we rage.* But when bumblebees threaten extinction on us we panic. Why? Because what’s big, ultimately, is expendable. It’s what’s very very small thatContinue reading “Ecology, Economy, and Ego”